Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Six, College? Prepared or Not?

Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Six, College? Prepared or Not?

HA note: The following series is reprinted with permission from Brittany’s blog BAM. Part Six was originally published on June 4, 2012.

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Also in this series: Part One: Why I Wanted To Write This | Part Two: Survey Stats and Large Families | Part Three: Top 3 Reasons Parents Homeschool | Part Four: Academic and Emotional Experiences, K-8 | Part Five: The Highschool Experience | Part Six: College? Prepared or Not? | Part Seven: What About Socialization? | Part Eight: The Best Thing vs. What Was Missing | Part Nine, Do Former Homeschoolers Want to Homeschool? | Part Ten: Are the Stereotypes Better or Worse?

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Part Six, College? Prepared or Not?

When my 33 year old sister, Amberley, graduated from (home) high school, most people were very skeptical about whether homeshoolers could succeed academically in college.

Yet as first generation homeschoolers (families who started homeschooling right after it became legal in their states) started going to college, research was conducted that proved that homeschoolers, indeed, do very well in college!

My research for this segment of the survey supports this idea. I am very proud of the statistics for this portion of the survey as it shows that many homeschoolers pursue higher education and succeed!

As you will see from the testimonies though, not everyone felt prepared academically, even if they eventually did very well in the college classroom. I will share my [personal] story about feeling academically prepared after I present the data from the survey.

A brief note: I have both a Bachelors and Masters degree in English and currently teach at a University. That being said, many of my friends/ former classmates/ friends of friends who participated in this survey also have advanced degrees. Though I do know that many homeschooled students pursue higher education, the numbers may be slightly greater here due to my personal connections.

Survey Question: Did you pursue higher education after high school? If so, what is the highest level of education you have earned?

Results:

  • Associates: 4
  • Bachelors: 18
  • Masters: 9 (one has 2 masters!; one in Med school)
  • PhD: 1
  • Attended college but didn’t finish: 3
  • Currently in college: 6
  • Other (Cosmetology; ministry certificate): 3
  • Didn’t go to college: 2

The next question on the survey asked whether the adult felt prepared for college academically by his or her homeschool experience. Here are the results:

76% (32 participants) said “Yes”:

Samantha C. 24 from MO: Yes, yes, yes. The night before I left for college, I was terrified that the classroom experience would be too much for me. However, when I got to college, I realized that I had spent the last 10 years educating myself, stretching myself, and had developed a natural curiosity and a desire and eagerness to learn. Freshman year was actually frustrating because I felt that I was being “spoonfed” my education. I was on the Dean’s or the President’s list every semester.

Marybeth M. 29 from CA: I think the only way it helped prepare me was in writing papers and the variety of those papers. I was really afraid of being “secular-shocked” after being Christian sheltered for my entire life. And that I would be behind academically. I don’t remember being behind, and only one class was very anti-Christian.

Renee P. 30 from MS: I was very scared about starting community college. I had myself convinced that I wouldn’t know what to do in a classroom and I would fail school. However after I walked in sat down I never had another problem. I was very prepared academically and did very well in all my classes in college. I felt I had adequate background and I also knew how to learn.

Nara N. 30 from NC: Homeschooling was superior preparation for college because I already knew how to work on my own; lectures by professors were gravy to my college education because I could basically teach myself most material from a book already. I was also used to mastering material on my own so it was natural for me to do this in college. Working independently was an even bigger part of grad school.

Many, many adults noted that they were prepared for college because they already knew how to be  independent learners and take initiative for their education.

14% (or 6 participants) said that homeschooling “Sort of” prepared them for college: 

Grady S. 26 from FL: Yes, but not prepared for the classroom atmosphere. I did take a couple classes at the community college before; that helped but [it was] still different.

Megan V. 27 from IA: Mostly. I am relatively smart anyway, and I am also naturally good with words. So although there probably were gaps in my education, I didn’t sense the gaps incredibly well; I picked stuff up. I think the biggest lack was actually in writing. In high school, my mom and I had re-read papers to see if they were “awkward.” I went into college revising papers by checking to see if they sounded “awkward” and then discovered that was a really horrible way to write. I spent a semester getting Bs and Cs before I figured out how to actually revise papers. 

That said, I think I got lucky because I have smart parents who made me do school and read the books and take tests . . . The testing and results culture in the public school may be difficult and ill-advised for many respects, but by and large, teachers there know how to train students to meet expectations and follow directions. This is not something I believe is taught in homeschooling, or even in Christian schools. A homeschooling family is, by their very nature, the maverick of the educational world. And although kids need to be taught to think for themselves, it is equally important to guarantee that they do in fact think – something that not every homeschooling family is prepared to teach their kids.

M. L. 26 from NE: No and yes. I struggled a lot, but I still managed to graduate with a 3.8. I felt like I wasn’t prepared to juggle all the classes and assignments, I struggled with writing papers, which was something we rarely did. 

Once I was in college, I felt like I missed out on so much!! There were classes I just loved like my literature class. I took it with a friend who was also homeschooled and we both felt like we were cheated and there were so many classic books and writers we had never heard of. I did awesome in most of the class, but when it came to our test it was all essay questions and I froze, because I had never done anything like that. My teacher was so great and so encouraging; she thought what I wrote was great but I gave up on the test. I really wish I had more guidance in writing, to pursue that interest and I would have loved to developed those skills….

Another participant said: Most definitely; the only aspect that was negative was that I didn’t have to study in college which led to a bit of undisciplined learning in post-graduate work.


My note: So many people said they struggled with writing because they received no instruction in it while homeschooled! Sadly, this was also my own experience. However, as I am now an English teacher, I strongly encourage parents to help their homeschool students learn how to write (or find someone to teach them!). If you are in Lynchburg VA, please email me (bmeng@liberty.edu).

9% (4 participants) said that they felt that homeschooling did not prepare them for college: 

M. W. 27 from GA: I didn’t feel very prepared. I had never been in a formal education setting in my life. I had never written a paper until I was in college. My family and I would discuss things, so I was very good at communicating but unprepared for all the writing.

M. W. 30 from OH: I had a hard time adjusting to college. By the end of my freshman year I had it figured out . . . I had some serious disadvantages in high school and college starting out. I have been able to get past most of them now.

S. M. 29 from WV: Not necessarily. I think I would have excelled in any academic environment. I was more prepared for the independent study of college, but that just have been the way my parents chose to homeschool me.

E. M. 26 from FL: I felt I was behind in some areas, not to put my Mom under the bus but areas where she was weaker tend to still be my weak points. It’s difficult to teach someone when you get just as frustrated as them due to not fully understanding the topic.

I think it is wonderful that 95% of the adults who took this survey pursed some sort of higher education. 60% have earned a Bachelors degree or higher! I think current homeschool students and parents can take comfort and heart in these numbers.

My Story: I do not think I was prepared academically for college but….

I was the 3rd of 5 children. My oldest sister (Amberley, mentioned at the beginning of this post) completed high school through a correspondence program, so her diploma is from an accredited private school. My second oldest sister, Chelsea, had no desire to pursue a degree from a college or University (her love was Cosmetology, which she trained for; she is now working in a salon as a stylist).

Neither Chelsea nor I used the correspondence school that Amberley used (I am not sure why). I remember picking my own curriculum and being in charge of my own schooling from 8th grade-12th grade. I took traditional high school math and science courses (Algebra, Geometry, Biology, Chemistry).There was no high school co-op offered when I was in high school, though we did get together with a few homeschool families for science labs.  I don’t remember taking history (although my elementary/Jr. High history studies were excellent). We did Rosetta Stone for French (It didn’t stick) and continued in our Bible curriculum (always excellent).

I never took a literature course in high school, though I did read books (there was no discussion or papers). The only writing instruction I received was when I took Composition I at a local college my Senior year. Ironically, I wanted to be an English major because I loved to read and write “stories.”

Once I got to college, I did well, although I had a lot of academic anxiety about what it meant to “do well.” (Ultimately, I graduated with a 3.7 GPA in undergraduate and a 3.9 in my MA).

College was my first experience with taking tests (we didn’t take any beyond Math tests), taking notes, writing papers, working in groups (hated and still hate this!), and getting grades (we didn’t get grades in our homeschool either. My mom would just assess where we were and had us repeat the work if we didn’t know it yet).

The only time I felt like college was “hard” was in a Spanish class. It was my second semester (first semester I got a B and didn’t learn a thing–very “absent minded” professor!) with a very strict and rather compassionless professor. This class required a lot of speaking out loud in front of others. I was morbidly embarrassed of doing this, of making mistakes in front of others–which I did frequently because I was so self-conscious. I cried multiple times in class.

After seeking tutoring, going to the professor for help, and spending 4-5 hours on homework assignments, I ultimately dropped the class. In reality, I just couldn’t handle the fact that I wasn’t good at something (homeschooling often encourages students to pursue the subjects they are good at and to just “get by” in the others) and I was socially embarrassed in front of my peers.

Perhaps being involved in more group learning during my homeschooing years, such as a co-op (or being in a traditional school setting) would have helped me in this situation. I’d like to blame the teacher (he was pretty harsh) but I know my own insecurities and lack of preparation also contributed to this failure.

In my English classes I actually blossomed. I finally had an outlet for all my thoughts (but was reminded by several professors in several classes to “let others have a turn to talk”….ugh. Socially awkward homeschooler, right there!). I did well on my papers (I only recall one C on an English paper in my whole undergraduate career)–though not due to my writing skills. (I had good ideas. I feel like I really learned to write when I got to grad school).

Honestly, I don’t believe I was prepared academically for college, especially in my chosen field (woefully unprepared in writing and critical thinking!) but I got by because homeschooling taught me to be an independent learner and I was extremely self-motivated. These were the gifts that homeschooling gave me (though I feel that my “real” education began when I went to college and when I pursued my masters degree).

What about you?

After being homeschooled did you pursue higher education? Did you feel like you were prepared academically? 

If you homeschool your child, how are you preparing him or her academically for college?

Please feel free to comment below or ask any questions! Also, please share this post on Facebook or other social networking sites if you think that this series would be beneficial to others!

The next post will be about whether homeschoolers felt socially prepared for “the real world” — yes, I am going to tackle that huge question, “What about socialization?!” The survey results are extremely enlightening and thought provoking! Please keep reading!

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To be continued.

21 comments

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part One, Why I Wanted to Write This | H • A

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Two, Survey Stats and Large Families | H • A

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Three, Why Parents Homeschool | H • A

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Four, Academic and Emotional Experiences, K-8 | H • A

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Five, The Highschool Experience | H • A

  • I find it a bit distressing that here, where you say that the higher education results might be screwed by the fact that you have basically just surveyed people in your extended network. If you know that the results are skewed with regards to higher education, why do you think they hold up elsewhere?

    • I am not claiming that they will hold up elsewhere. I simply am presenting the results that I had to work with with the caveat that my extended network is one of higher education. Other homeschoolers may and will have different stories. Every story is unique. By presenting the information about my higher education, I wanted to make sure that my readers get “the whole story” about the educational experiences that are presented in my series.

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Seven, What About Socialization? | H • A

  • You mention that you teach college English. You listed your email address as @liberty.edu. That would be Jerry Fallwell’s Liberty University. You should disclose that fact to the reader to keep in mind when reading these rosy results that seem out of sync with other stories on this site.

    • Since my series discusses homeschool experiences and not my current employment, I am not sure why that information is relevant; it is not a secret though that I work for Liberty University. Also, I addressed the rather “out of sync” aspect of some of the information in my series in the introduction post. Hope it explains my thoughts in contributing to HA. Thanks for reading!

      • The way disclosure works is, you disclose something and the other party, in this case the reader, decides if it is relevant or not. Your series has a taint of dishonesty.

    • Dishonesty is a very strong word. Could you explain?

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Eight, The Best Thing vs. What Was Missing | H • A

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Nine, Do Former Homeschoolers Want to Homeschool? | H . A

  • Pingback: Adult Homeschoolers Speak Out: Part Ten, Are the Stereotypes Better or Worse? | H . A

  • How many get advanced science degrees?

  • I know this is for homeschoolers, but I wanted to comment from a nonhomeschooler, who has homeschooled her children, viewpoint.
    I did very well in public school, went on to community college, and graduated with an ADN nursing degree with high honors.
    I first began homeschooling due to the public school in our area being not desirable. As I had become a stay home mom, we couldn’t afford the private school. I’m glad now that we couldn’t.
    I had to learn phonics as I taught my son to read because we didn’t learn to read that way in 1976 when I was in first grade. I was so amazed when he learned to read from a teacher who had to relearn in that manner!
    Over the years I developed a God given conviction to homeschool. I’ve had several friends ask me to pray God would make a way for them to homeschool, but when He did, they weren’t willing to sacrifice their time to invest in their kids. It is a major sacrifice. No one has the patience needed to homeschool without the desire and determination to be committed to the task. The trying of your faith brings patience. Definition of homeschool- the trying of your faith, lol!
    All this to say, as a public schooled student, I entered college with a lot of the same limitations I have read that the people posted who were homeschooled thought were disadvantages from being homeschooled. I don’t believe that to be so. I was weak in high school science. Most people have a weak subject. My mom helped me zilch in school. Teachers helped only so far as classroom instruction. I was socialally shy and uncomfortable in front of others despite being involved in sports, band, chorus, etc.
    So I just wanted to debunk the ideas some listed. The people may not have been AS prepared for college if they WEREN’T homeschooled. I know lots of my fellow public schoolers who flunked out of college because they partied and weren’t disciplined to study. That is a great advantage of homeschooling to me. To influence your children to choose Godly actions and avoid a lot of the peer pressure and opportunities that are linked with public/private school attendance.
    What if homeschooling helps keep your children from a life of immorality, drug abuse, mooching off others, etc. ?
    There is a serious lack of discipline in the children these days. Is it connected to the fact parents aren’t disciplined?
    In my opinion, yes! Whatever you choose for your child, be disciplined to stay focused on helping them become dedicated to God first.

  • Liberty University is a 5th rate joke of a university. I would encourage readers to receive instruction from teachers that matriculated at respected schools. When the worthless lawyers of the Bush administration started getting sued, they hired lawyers from respected schools, not their fellow Liberty alumni. I was a Spanish tutor in college. I worked with several home-schooled students because they were not prepared to learn a foreign language. Some of these kids were extremely bright but also extremely immature compared to the their peers who attended traditional high schools.

    • Hi Jason, I’m the author of this article. I am not quite sure why you brought Liberty into your comments as the focus of the article was whether or not homeschooled students were prepared for higher education, not promoting a certain school.

      Glad you were ablet to help homeschool students through your tutoring! I’m sure they benefited from your support!

  • Thanks for the info. Looks like it is important to have some writing education in your homeschooling, and maybe some pubic speaking would be good as well. I have been homeschooled since kindergarten and as a Senior am doing fine in my dual enrollment classes.

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